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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
're going to get to between israel and gaza. hamas aims rockets at jerusalem and they miss. but the fact hamas is going after what israel considers its capital city shows how much pressure is building in the middle east right now. i want you to listen to this. so an i reporter captured air raid sirens going off in jerusalem. hamas, the group that controls gaza, landed south of jerusalem. more rockets aimed for tel aviv ende in the water. no reports of damagen either case, though. but officials say 27 palestinians have died since weesday from israel's strike in gaza. this is israeli defense forces video showi what they say, look at this, they say this is munition sites. israel points to the stockpiles as more proof hamas is trying escalate tension. hamas says israel is to blame. people live in fear of how close the attacks will come. listen to one man in gaza just last night. >> i fear my life is at risk by merely being out the streets. i literally felt i could lose my life at any moment. target i targeting israeli civilians, i might as well -- >> he was able to reconnect with us moments
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
island woke up without power. joining me now live on the phone is new york congressman steve israel whose district encompasses a large portion of island. what can you give us on the progress this morning? >> we've gone from a wind emergency and a flood emergency to a power emergency. as you just said, there are nearly 3/4 of 1 million long islanders who do not have power. long island power authority is making a slow and incremental progress. what concerns me at this point is last night for the first time since the storm, the temperatures dipped down into the 30s. so long islanders are experiencing very cold temperatures. if it continues, this becomes beyond a power emergency. it becomes a public health and safety emergency. one thing that the administration has done, which i'm grateful for, is they've deployed national forest service assets, chainsaws, woodchipers, and personnel, about 120 national forest service personnel to long island to help with tree removal and downed trees. >> it is pretty amazing when we think about this being november 1st. here we are talking about being in the t
misspoke and said there were no more hospitals in manhattan open. i forgot about beth israel. which is down at the lower eve east side. so there is one. la guardia will open tomorrow. that's the good news. as for the limited subway service that resumes tomorrow in new york, there in new york, no trains will be running south of 34th street, an area that includes, of course, the financial district. sandy's crippled the nation's biggest transit system. some stations remain under water right now. there's catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it is too early to tell when full service will return or if every subway line can be fixed. some of them may be beyond repair. millions of riders depend on the subway each day, all of us in the city. a few commuter train lines went into service this afternoon. for the most part, commuters relied on buses, on cars, on cabs if they could get them and gouged for prices on the cabs. there is gridlock as bad as we have ever seen in manhattan. look at this. this is columbus circle south of central park on the west side earlier toda
the importance of the relationship, the special relationship with israel. and this is a president that has frankly abandoned, thrown israel under the the bus. this is a president who has appeased the enemies of the united states, whether it's castro brothers, whether it's chavez or others and apologizes for the united states and when mitt romney is elected we're going to change that and get somebody in the white house with backbone who understands we have to support our allies and support our friends and frankly, oppose our adversaries and enemies. and the thing is here, you have a governor making tough decisions, but approval ratings are out 40%. and how does that translate? >> look, you know, the governor has inherited a very difficult situation, and, buts' making it better and his numbers are getting better and i think you'll see that his numbers continue to get better. people in florida are sophisticated and continue not to accept this. what we have right now is the best that the country has to offer. i have a seven-year-old son,'s going to be seven in december. for his sake, he deserv
said there were no more hospitals in lower manhattan open. but i forgot about beth israel. so there is one. laguardia airport. late word tonight it will reopen tomorrow, that is the good news. as for limited subway service that resumes tomorrow in new york, no rains running south of 34th street in an area that includes the financial district. sandy has crippled the nation's biggest transit system. some stations remain underwater. catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it's too early to tell when full service will return or if every subway line can actually be fixed. some may be beyond repair. millions depend on the subway each day. all of us in the city a few commuter train lines went back into service this afternoon. for the most part, commuters relied on buses, cars, and cabs and weren't being gouged on prices. gridlock as bad as we've been seen in manhattan. take a look at columbus circle, south of central park on the west side earlier today. one massive traffic jam, largely caused by that train, still dangling over 57th street and closed off
change happening and israel. we have tolerated the deniers for far too long in this body. the public is with us, the science is clear, our national security establishments, our business communities all know that this is real. there is a rear guard action in this building led by polluters to try to prevent us from taking action on this but we have to face the fact that the deniers are wrong. they are just plain dead wrong. whatever their motivations may be and that is a separate question, they are wrong. we have to deal with that and i think some of the courtesies we have given to one another collegiality really have to yield to the fact that other things being said in the senate and occasionally regrettably in this committee chamber are just plain wrong but sandy shows the price of not being attentive to these facts and i thank you for your leadership. >> i want to thank you for your remarks. i feel as you do that the clock is ticking and hurricane sandy have shown us all what the scientists sitting right in this room the day i got the gavel told us exactly what would happen and it i
manhattan, and that's beth israel. mayor michael bloomberg talked about what happened. >> they didn't think the damage was that bad and we did have a generator going and the national guard helped carry fuel up to the roof, because that's where the fuel tank was and they were running out. but the bottom line is when they got into the basement, they realized there was more damage. >> a lot of questions about this right now. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel
choose obama. in germany, 92%. in israel, polls strongly favor romney who locally supported iran's nuclear facility. continuity and age is important to nations in transition. >> there are people worried about if the brother is going to run amuck. i'm not sure what they expect america to do or how gentle they want the president to be, but they see america as something to potentially save them from egypt. >> reporter: and what about china at the brink of an important party election of its own? >> the election will affect how the world will be going in ten years. >> reporter: analysts say the reason so many europeans could be so reluctant to see the administration change in the u.s. is because they worry about what's forging the new relationship to them and politically speaking to them, change doesn't necessarily have a positive connotation. in some of their own experiences lately, it has only worsened problems, like with youth unemployment. savannah? >> michelle kosinski in london this morning. thank you so much. >>> just ahead, how well does voice." we'll put her to the test after
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)